•About Galileo
•Software
•How to Connect
•How to Use
•Cluster Status
•Change Password


•SSH to Galileo (java client)


•Start NXplugin Session

•Download NX Session Profile

•Download Standalone SSH Client for Windows (putty)


•Physics CA Certificate


•Documentation

Connecting to Galileo from Windows

  • Running Programs:

    • OpenNX
      If you need to run programs that have graphical interfaces (things you click on, rather than just text you type), the best choice for communicating with Galileo is OpenNX. It is by far the fastest way to run graphical applications on Galileo. For information about how to use it, see the following link:

      Using OpenNX to talk to Galileo >>

      OpenNX will work fine for non-graphical programs, too.

    • Other alternatives
      Alternatively you can use SSH instead of OpenNX to connect to Galileo. Windows doesn't come with an SSH program, but there are many SSH programs that you can install. Two of them are PuTTY, which is free, and SecureCRT, for which UVa has a site license. Both of these are already installed on standard Windows computers in our department.

      • PuTTY:

        PuTTY is a free and very easy to use ssh client. You can download putty.exe here. Start the program and a Configuration Window will appear. Enter galileo.phys.virginia.edu for the HOSTNAME in the Session Configuration. You will then be prompted to enter your userID/password to complete the connection.

        If you will be using graphical applications, make sure to Enable X11 Forwarding before you connect. To do this look at the menu option on the left hand side of the configuration widow. select Configuration --> SSH --> X11 then select Enable X11 Forwarding. Then select Session to complete your connection. (You will also need an X server installed on your computer if you intend to run graphical applications from PuTTY. See below.)

        Note that graphical applications will be orders of magnitude more sluggish when run this way than they would be when run through OpenNX.

      • SecureCRT:

        You can obtain SecureCRT here:

        http://its.virginia.edu/software/securecrt/

        If you will be using graphical applications, make sure to Enable X11 Forwarding before you connect. To do this, start SecureCRT, then:

        1. Select Options from the Toolbar Menus, click on Global Options.
        2. Click on Default Session .
        3. Select Edit Default Settings from the Default Session Setup window.
        4. Under the Connection category, select X11.
        5. Put a checkmark next to Forward X11 Packets in the X11 Forwarding window.
        6. Click on OK.

        (You will also need an X server installed on your computer if you intend to run graphical applications from SecureCRT. See below.)

        Note that graphical applications will be orders of magnitude more sluggish when run this way than they would be when run through OpenNX.

      • X Server (VcXsrv):

        In order to run graphical programs from within PuTTY or SecureCRT, your computer will need to have an "X server" installed. An X server is a program that allows programs running on remote computers to display images on your screen and receive input from your keyboard and mouse. For Windows, we recommend an X server called "VcXsrv". It's free, and can be obtained here:

        https://sourceforge.net/projects/vcxsrv

        Note that VcXsrv can be run in two modes: In "multiwindow" mode, graphical applications running on Galileo will appear just like locally-running applications. This is the recommended mode. Alternatively, in "single window" mode, any remote applications will appear inside a single, large "VcXsrv" window.

        To get VcXsrv to start automatically when you log into your computer, do the following:

        1. After you've installed VcXsrv, hold down the "Windows" key and type R, then type:
          c:\program files\vcxsrv\xlaunch.exe
          
          and press the Enter key. A window like this should appear.

        2. Keep clicking "Next" until you get to the dialog box shown here:

        3. Click "Save Configuration" and save the configuration as config.xlaunch on your desktop. Now hold down the "Windows" key and type R, then type:
          shell:startup
          
          and press the Enter key. This will open up your startup folder. Drag the config.xlaunch icon from your desktop into this folder.

        4. Restart your computer. VcXsrv should now be running and ready to display remote graphics.

  • Copying Files to and from Galileo:

    From computers inside the Physics Department:

    From Windows computers in our department (only), you can get to your Galileo home directory by just clicking on Start --> Run and typing:

    \\galileo.phys.virginia.edu\username

    where "username" is your user name on Galileo. This will prompt you for your password, and then open a file browser showing you your Galileo home directory.

    From computers anywhere:

    From computers anywhere, you can get to your Galileo home directory by using the SCP or SFTP network protocols. Windows doesn't come with programs that speak these protocols, but there are many such programs that you can install. Two of them are WinSCP, which is free, and SecureFX, for which UVa has a site license.

    All of the standard Windows computers set up by our Physics Department IT staff already have these programs installed. On these computers, you can get to your Galileo home directory by clicking Start --> Run, then typing "sftp://username@galileo.phys.virginia.edu". You'll be asked to log in using your Galileo password. Once logged in, you'll see your Galileo files and can drag files back and forth between the local and remote computers.


If you have forgotten your password or need other help, please click here to submit a request.